Author Archives: Heather Ripley

Heather Ripley
Heather Ripley is an associate in the firm’s Federal & International Tax Group. Her practice focuses on federal and international tax services for a range of clients, including domestic and international business entities and individuals.  Read More

First Round of Proposed GILTI Regulations Avoids the Hard(er) Stuff

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The IRS’s opening salvo of proposed regulations under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act’s global intangible low-taxed income is as complex as you would think. Our International Tax Group cuts through the clutter to address the key takeaways: Computation of GILTI inclusion Anti-abuse rules GILTI guidance still to come Read the full advisory here.  [...]Read more

Foreign Tax Credit Refund Claim Denied as Untimely

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Our International Tax Group discusses a recent case that offers a cautionary tale on statutory limitations periods and shows how even seemingly straightforward provisions are open to interpretation. 10 years vs. three years vs. two years? When is a refund “attributable to” foreign taxes? What does it mean to “pay” taxes? Read the full advisory here. [...]Read more

Trickle Down Guidance: Interim Notices Tackle Key International Reforms

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The IRS gives taxpayers a bit more direction on two provisions of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act already in force. Our International Tax Group breaks down the new guidance for the repatriation tax and foreign partner withholding. Notice 2018-26 previews anti-avoidance and other rules under Section 965 Notice 2018-29 moves ahead with withholding for non-publicly traded partnerships under Section 1446(f) Read the full advisory here.  [...]Read more

Treasury Would Overhaul 2016 Regulatory Guidance

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With tax reform on the horizon, Treasury takes aim at three sets of regulations with clear cross-border implications. Our International Tax Group explains the department’s recommendations to scrap much of Section 385 and overhaul Sections 367 and 987. Revoking the Section 385 documentation rules Expanding the active business exception to foreign goodwill under Section 367 Deferring transition rules under Section 987 to 2019 Read the full advisory here. [...]Read more

International Tax ADVISORY: Section 721(c) Partnership Regulations Arrive Just in Time

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On January 18, 2017, the IRS issued temporary and proposed regulations (T.D. 9814) under section 721(c) to address transfers of appreciated property by U.S. persons to partnerships with related foreign partners. With some alterations, these regulations deliver on guidance announced in Notice 2015-54, released in August 2015 (see our prior coverage of Notice 2015-54 here). The regulations incorporate a number of taxpayer-friendly updates in response to comments on the Notice. The prospect of further direction in this area, however, including guidance under Sections 482 and 6662 as described in the [...]Read more

International Tax Advisory: Treasury Issues Final & Temporary Section 385 Regulations

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Our International Tax Group explores the final debt-equity regulations under Section 385, highlighting significant modifications to the rules proposed last April. While the regulations remain controversial, the final version brings a number of taxpayer-friendly changes, including a reduction in scope and general delay in application.

Alston & Bird’s full International Tax advisory can be found here: www.alston.com/advisories/section-385-regulations 

International Tax Advisory: Back to School: Recent Cases Offer Lessons in International Tax “Basics”

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Our International Tax Group offers a refresher course on U.S. residency start dates and double taxation with U.S. territories.

Click here to read the full advisory.

International Tax Advisory: Taking a Gap Year: Delayed U.S. CbC Reporting Creates Hassle for U.S. Multinationals

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Just a few key differences between U.S. proposed regulations on country-by-country reporting and the OECD’s BEPS recommendations are causing administrative headaches. Our International Tax Group minds the gap and explains what it means for U.S. multinationals.

Click here to read the full advisory.